At this time of year we tend to expect “best behavior” from our children.  Instead we get tears and tantrums, sulking and defiance. With friends and relatives around, our parenting is on display and our desire to be seen as good parents with perfectly behaved children makes everything harder.

Here’s a check list to help you avoid your worst Christmas nightmare and fill you and your family with festive cheer instead.

Some mornings, I wake up wallowing in self-pity, wanting everyone else in my family to go about their daily business as I continue to lay there. Do I feel this way often? No. But when I do, it is the precursor to impending “bad girl mom” behavior.  

On a recent Wednesday night, a youth pastor friend invited me to sit on a panel to answer questions posed by his youth group. The panel was made up of parents who had survived the teenage years with their own kids. They hoped to impart a nugget or two of knowledge to teens who were working hard to “raise their own parents.” 

I’ve always loved the holidays and the overabundance of food and the weird, hybrid Thanksgiving recipes brought by each person that walks in the door. I’d always heard that you can’t ruin dressing. 

Yes. Yes, you can. You can absolutely, positively, 100 percent ruin dressing. 

For most of us mamas, fall in Alabama means visiting the pumpkin patch with our kiddos, enjoying pumpkin spice everything, and getting ready for the Thanksgiving holiday. We’re also one step closer to preparing for Black Friday, and two steps closer to having a vacation during the Christmas holiday season. Whew! There is so much going on here, there, and everywhere that we may not realize our kids are feeling burned out.  

Parents, Thanksgiving is right around the corner! Use this holiday to talk to children about the importance of giving back and teach social-emotional learning concepts like gratitude and empathy.

As a parent, you are your child’s first and most important teacher. They learn more from you at home and in their preschool years than they will any other time in their life. How your child grows and develops in these years will affect their later development in life.

Ever had a question or concern about what your child should be doing at a certain age?  See below for developmental milestones that your child should reach at each age.

Hopefully, parents, you'll have a little extra time to spend with your kids this holiday season. And if you do, consider hanging out one evening and reading to them. Here are 10 reasons you really want to make the effort...

When I was in junior high, I used to set an alarm for 1 a.m.  Why?  My brother was a senior in high school, and that was usually when he came home on the weekends.  I would wake up a few minutes before his curfew and turn the television on.  I made sure it looked like I’d been up all along.  Why did I go to all this trouble?  This was the only time my brother and I really hung out.  After all, he was a senior, a star baseball player, and he had a beautiful girlfriend.  If I wanted any time to have him to myself, I had to make an effort.   

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Druid City Living (DCL) is Tuscaloosa, Alabama's premier community newspaper, covering the great people, places and activities of the area.

 

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