Opinion: Monday Morning Quarterbacks Really Drive Me Nuts Featured

Derek Osborn is a non-profit and addictions and prevention speaker and consultant. He lives in Tuscaloosa with his wife, Lynn, and their daughters, Savannah and Anica. Follow him on Twitter @ozborn34.  Derek Osborn is a non-profit and addictions and prevention speaker and consultant. He lives in Tuscaloosa with his wife, Lynn, and their daughters, Savannah and Anica. Follow him on Twitter @ozborn34. Derek Osborn

There are plenty of Monday morning quarterbacks to go around. 

At the time this masterful composition was being carefully constructed (mid-April), the common theme among the talking heads was whether or not the President, the Governors, the Mayors, the (insert elected official you randomly want to blame here) acted swiftly enough to the Covid-19 outbreak. The simple answer is likely “no.” But as always, the simple answer almost never covers the complexity of the issue. And in this case, it doesn't even come close. 

Enter the Monday morning quarterbacks. Simple definition of the MMQB: a person who passes judgment on and criticizes something after the event. Being a MMQB is easy. Being proactive in potentially SHUTTING DOWN A COUNTRY, OR A STATE, OR A CITY affecting the lives of hundreds of millions of people to help stop the spread of a novel virus we knew nothing about is not. 

Here’s your reminder: we’ve never encountered anything like this before. The most common comparison is the Spanish Flu of 1918 which, by the way, didn't even originate in Spain. During that time, there was a tacit agreement among some Western governments and newspapers not to report any bad news, keeping the information on the flu out of the headlines. Spain had no such agreement and disseminated the virus news at will. 

Fast forward to 2020, when news (fake or otherwise) flows freely like a waterfall into the depths of social media hell. Waiting at the bottom sits a vocal minority who are apparently experts on just about everything; the woulda coulda shoulda’s who have no problem judging your leadership and decision making. 

Has the virus response been handled correctly at all levels? Probably not. Did we act fast enough? Probably not. Could this all have been avoided? We don't know yet. Was there a Covid-19 instruction manual available back in January? No. Should we actively judge others for doing the best they can in a situation they never thought they’d encounter? If that is what makes you happy, then knock yourself out. 

In the meantime, here is something interesting to try: if you hear someone on radio or television or anywhere else for that matter state that we didn’t do enough fast enough, and that they would have most certainly done it better, go check their social media feeds to see what they were doing in February. You’ll likely find that none of them were flexing their own personal option of social distancing, even when they “were aware of the danger.” 

If being a leader was easy, everybody would do it. Let’s learn from our mistakes and become better – and cut out the Monday morning quarterbacking. 

Rate this item
(0 votes)

Druid City Living (DCL) is Tuscaloosa, Alabama's premier community newspaper, covering the great people, places and activities of the area.

 

captcha