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Community - Druid City Living, Tuscaloosa's premier community newspaper. - Druid City Living, Tuscaloosa's premier community newspaper. http://druidcityliving.com Thu, 21 Jun 2018 20:28:09 -0500 MYOB en-gb Bama Belle Riverboat to Host Joint Fundraiser on the Black Warrior River on June 21 http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2402-bama-belle-riverboat-to-host-joint-fundraiser-on-the-black-warrior-river-on-june-21 http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2402-bama-belle-riverboat-to-host-joint-fundraiser-on-the-black-warrior-river-on-june-21 The Bama Belle Paddlewheel Riverboat sunset cruise on June 21 will benefit the Black Warrior River watershed.

The Bama Belle Riverboat will be rocking during an upcoming fundraiser to help support the efforts to protect the Black Warrior River watershed. This Thursday, June 21 from 6-9 p.m., Black Warrior Riverkeeper and Hurricane Creekkeeper will share a joint fundraiser on the Black Warrior River. 

The sunset cruise on board the Bama Belle is a public event to celebrate the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Creekkeeper – the Friends of Hurricane Creek’s environmental enforcement program led by John Wathen. 

“John Wathen is a world-famous defender of water,” said Charles Scribner, Executive Director of Black Warrior Riverkeeper. “Alabama is blessed to have John as its Hurricane Creekkeeper, and Black Warrior Riverkeeper is grateful to have the Friends of Hurricane Creek as a partner.”

“It has been our honor and pleasure to be associated with such a powerful family of water advocates as Waterkeeper Alliance,” Wathen added.

Proceeds from the event will support both Waterkeeper Alliance organizations’ work to promote swimmable, fishable, and drinkable water. Hurricane Creek is a major tributary of the Black Warrior River in Tuscaloosa County. 

Admission includes dinner catered by The Levee, and a complimentary sampling of local beers by Druid City Brewing. The local band the NoJoes will provide music during the cruise. Boarding begins at 6 p.m., and the boat leaves at 6:30 p.m. This event is for ages 21 and up. Guests under 21 can attend with a parent or guardian, but will need a ticket – as space is limited. Tickets are on sale for $40 per person at bamabelle2018.eventbrite.com. 

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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
Songwriters to Share Music and Stories at Inaugural Druid City Songwriters Festival http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2401-songwriters-to-share-music-and-stories-at-inaugural-druid-city-songwriters-festival http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2401-songwriters-to-share-music-and-stories-at-inaugural-druid-city-songwriters-festival Over 40 different songwriters will be in Tuscaloosa over the weekend of June 21-24, for the inaugural Druid City Songwriters Festival. They’ll perform at various bars and restaurants as well as Government Plaza.

It’s part concert, part storytelling, and for Tuscaloosa, it’s an event that is the first of its kind. 

The inaugural Druid City Songwriters Festival will be held June 21-24 in downtown Tuscaloosa and will feature more than 40 songwriters. 

“It’s a new type of event that we are bringing to the area,” said Megan McMillan, a local songwriter who is organizing the festival. 

McMillan said she has participated in songwriter festivals in other areas and has enjoyed them more than anything else she’s ever done. That’s why she wanted to bring one to Tuscaloosa. 

“The whole idea of the songwriter rounds that make up the festival started in Nashville,” she said. 

A songwriter round is made up of three or four writers who are on stage together. During a round, each songwriter will play a song they wrote and then share the story behind the song. After each writer performs three or four songs, the group moves to another venue, and other writers take their place for the next round. 

“Somebody in the audience can see nine to 12 songwriters in one venue, or they can follow the songwriter that they want to see to different venues,” McMillan said.    

“It’s very personal, because it’s a side of the song and the performance that you don’t see otherwise. The whole round itself is very intimate. It’s like a storytelling performance. The stories are just as good as the songs, sometimes even better.”

While the performance rounds will be held in bars and restaurants, McMillan said audience members shouldn’t expect a party atmosphere.

“We’re going to promote listening-room environments. People will come in, get a drink, and listen to the songs. It’s not a party environment. It’s an environment where you pay your respect to the songwriter, who is telling their story.”

Audience members with a particular music preference will be able to hear their favorite genre as songwriters in country, folk, rock, blues, and even psychedelia are scheduled to appear. There is no charge to attend the performance rounds.

The festival begins with a welcoming party at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, June 21 at Black Warrior Brewing Company. Tommy Barnes, who wrote the song “Indian Outlaw” recorded by Tim McGraw, will perform.

Songwriter Tommy Barnes, who lived in Winfield during his teen years, has written songs for Tim McGraw, Hank Williams Jr., Little Texas, and many others, is a performer at the inaugural Druid City Songwriters Festival.

On Friday, June 22 the performance rounds begin at 4 p.m. at Black Warrior Brewing Company, and Band of Brothers Brewing Company.

Barnes, along with hit songwriters Troy Martin and Steve Leslie, will perform at Government Plaza at 6 p.m. Other songwriters will perform at Rhythm and Brews, Green Bar, Copper Top, and Billy’s Sports Grill in Northport beginning at 6 p.m. 

Leslie, a Grammy Award-winner, who has written songs recorded by Kenny Rogers, Mark Chesnutt, George Strait, Ricky Skaggs, and others, will hold a workshop for anyone interested in learning about songwriting on Saturday, June 23 at 10 a.m. at Hotel Indigo. The cost for the workshop is $25.

“Anyone interested in the Nashville songwriting process should come to the workshop,” Leslie said. “I’m going to talk about how we do it here, what we do once the song is written, and how much money can be earned.”

Saturday’s performance rounds begin at 2 p.m. at the breweries and 4 p.m. at the other locations. 

The festival will conclude for the public on Saturday night, with the final round being held at the rooftop terrace at Hotel Indigo at 7 p.m. A farewell brunch for the songwriters will be held on Sunday, June 24. 

During the weekend, an app for smartphones will be available to help audience members find where specific songwriters are performing. Schedules can also be picked up in the Hotel Indigo lobby or found on the Druid City Songwriters Festival website.

McMillan said songwriters and their followers have a passion for these types of music festivals, and she expects many visitors from outside Tuscaloosa. She had to turn away some artists who applied because this year’s festival just couldn’t accommodate them.

“I was really blown away by the amount of talent, and people from different states that applied, especially with this being our first year,” she said. 

“We didn’t have anything to tell these people, but that we were doing a festival, and they’re coming in from all over just for the opportunity to do a festival like this.”

Steve Leslie’s professional songwriting career spans more than 25 years. The Grammy Award-winner will perform and lead a songwriting workshop at the Druid City Songwriters Festival.

Leslie said he is glad Tuscaloosa is starting a songwriters’ festival.

“I love the idea,” he said. “The more opportunities available for people to hear and understand what it is we do the better! Also, inspiring younger songwriters is the best part of this job for me.”

 “I want people to come out and give it a shot,” McMillan said, “because I really believe people are going to love it.”

For more information about the Druid City Songwriters Festival, visit druidcitysongwritersfest.com or @DCSF18 on Facebook.   

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Community Tue, 19 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
DCL Weekly: Community Calendar of Events http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2399-dcl-weekly-community-calendar-of-events http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2399-dcl-weekly-community-calendar-of-events DCL Weekly: Community Calendar of Events

Here’s wishing all our Druid City Living readers a great week, filled with all kinds of outstanding local events. Get out, get involved, and above all else: Have fun. And remember: If you’d like to have your event added to our online weekly calendar, just email us at editor@druidcitymedia.com. We’re happy to add anything you’d like to announce.

Enjoy your week, T-Town!

Theatre Tuscaloosa’s Summer Theatre Camp: June 18-29, Sandra Hall Ray Fine Arts Center, Shelton State’s Martin Campus, Tuscaloosa. To register, or for more information, visit theatretusc.com. 

Alabama Museum of Natural History Expedition: June 18-23. Participants will have the unique opportunity to work with scientists in the field of archaeology as part of an actual scientific research project to explore the history of Alabama. Students, teachers, and adults will spend a week at the Expedition field camp working with scientists to learn excavation techniques, laboratory procedures, and artifact identification. For more information, visit museums.ua.edu.

Kids Clay Camps at Kentuck: Beginning June 19, The Clay Place, Kentuck’s Courtyard of Wonders. Red Dog Potter Shirley Hayes Dobbins instructs children on hand-building with clay, glazing, and self-expression. For more information, including age groups, pricing, and registration, call (205) 758-1257 or visit kentuck.org. 

Bama Art House Films Summer Series: Tuesdays through July 17 (No screening on July 3), 7:30 p.m. Box office opens at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call (205) 758-5195 or visit bamatheatre.org/bamaarthouse. 

Morning Pointe Rock-A-Thon: June 21, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Morning Pointe Tuscaloosa (1801 Rice Mine Road North). Meet on the porch, grab a rocking chair, enjoy live music, and help raise money for Alzheimer’s research. For more information, call 205-345-1112.

Druid City Songwriters Festival: June 21-23, Tuscaloosa. Venues throughout Tuscaloosa will welcome over 40 songwriters for a special “in the round” experience. For a complete schedule of performances and events, including host venues, visit @DCSF18 on Facebook.

Black Warrior Riverkeeper and Hurricane Creekkeeper River Cruise: June 21, 6-9 p.m. Bama Belle Riverboat, Tuscaloosa. This sunset cruise features live music, dinner, and local beer celebrates the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Creekkeeper. Proceeds support the Riverkeeper’s efforts to protect the Black Warrior River watershed. Ages 21 and up. Tickets: $40. To purchase, visit bamabelle2018.eventbrite.com.  

Green Scenes Summer Movie Series Presents “Finding Dory”: June 22, 1-3 p.m. Richard A. Curry complex (3440 Kauloosa Avenue). Arrive early to get your seats, as seating is limited to the first 100. Enjoy free popcorn and refreshments! For more information or to reserve a large group, call Tuscaloosa 311.

Live at the Plaza: June 22, 6 to 9 p.m. Government Plaza, downtown Tuscaloosa. This week’s music is part of the Druid City Songwriter’s Festival – The Mulligan Brothers will also perform. This event is free.

3rd Annual Dirt, Sweat & Gears Trail Duathlon: June 23, 7:30 a.m. Lake Lurleen State Park. This DCH Foundation and DCH Sports Medicine’s event features a 10-mile trail bike ride followed by a 5K run. This duathlon also allows team competition. Tickets: $45 individual/$80 team. For more information, call (205) 759-7349. 

National Rat Catcher’s Day at CHOM: June 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Hands-On Museum, downtown Tuscaloosa. Catch the rats in CHOM for a special prize. All activities are included in admission. For more information, visit chomonline.org.

T-Town BBQ Cook Off and Fun Day: June 23, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benjamin Barnes YMCA, Tuscaloosa. Face-painting, bouncy houses, games & other children's activities; vendors, Greek paraphernalia, information booths, freebies, health fair, and chances to win prizes. Raffle tickets $5.00; you do not have to be present to win. Proceeds to provide scholarship money for deserving West AL students.

Upcoming:

2018 Summer Northport Community Engagement Dinner: June 26, 5:30-7 p.m. The Levee, Northport. Join the Chamber, the Levee, and officials from Northport for dinner. This semi-annual event is designed to keep Northport business leaders and citizens informed on issues related to the Northport Community. Fees/admission: $20 (Chamber members); $30 (non-members). For more information, email carolyn@tuscaloosachamber.com.  

Secret Agent Saturday at CHOM: June 30, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Hands-On Museum, downtown Tuscaloosa. Secret messages and mysteries, agent badges and disguises…and more. All activities are included in admission. For more information, visit chomonline.org. 

Tedeschi Trucks Band with Drive-By Truckers, Marcus King Band: June 30, 6:30 p.m. Tuscaloosa Amphitheater. Tickets available via Ticketmaster.com. For more information, call the Tuscaloosa Amphitheater Box Office at (205) 248-5280. 

Ongoing:

Month of June

Summer Camps 2018 at CHOM: STEM Fun plus CHOM Play. “ZOOM!” June 11 - 15 • 9:30am - 12:30pm • $175 Explore Chemistry, Engineering, Circuitry, Robotics! Campers will Mix it! Design it! Build it! and Move it! Campers end the week with a Survival Raft competition. “C.S.I. CHOM” June 18 – 22 • 9:30am - 12:30pm • $175 It’s Child Science Investigator week! Crime soars in the summer heat. Campers solve CHOM’s Crime of the Summer as they Dust it! Bag it! Detect it! and Prove it! On Friday they’ll Solve it! For more information, visit chomonline.org. 

Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy Summer Camps: TCTA is offering free, four-day camps June 11-28, for students in grades 6 through 8. Camp topics include Engineering, Culinary Arts, Animation, Fire College, Police Academy, Cosmetology, Military/JROTC, TV Production, Drones, and Mercedes-Benz. Visit www.tuscaloosacityschools.com/Page/1947 for more information and to sign up.

Tuscaloosa Farmer’s Market: Saturdays, 7 a.m.-noon.; Tuesdays 3-6 p.m. Tuscaloosa River Market, 1900 Jack Warner Blvd, Tuscaloosa. Shop for fresh produce, grass fed beef, baked goods, cheeses and more. Buy fresh, buy local. For more information, visit tuscaloosarivermarket.com or call (205) 248-5295. 

 

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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Mon, 18 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
DCL Pet of the Week: Meet Gus http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2397-dcl-pet-of-the-week-meet-gus http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2397-dcl-pet-of-the-week-meet-gus DCL Pet of the Week: Meet Gus
Say hi to Gus, a handsome 2-year-old male Labrador/terrier mix.This handsome dog is the Humane Society of West Alabama's Pet of the Week!
 
Gus has the body of a lab with a smooth black and white coat. He is a big boy, weighing 45 pounds, but needs to put on more weight and get up to around 50 pounds. 

This fine fellow is a lover! Gus thrives on attention and likes to lean on you. He is friendly and very social. He would make a great workout dog for nice walks or jogs. 
 
 
Gus is too big for an apartment and will require a fenced-in yard so he can run and play, but he should not be an outside-only dog. He should be fine with children 8 and up, but not younger due to his large size.

He seems to do better with calm, laid back dogs and he tends to be the dominant dog. A trial would be done if there are other pets in the household to make sure all get along OK. 
 
Gus has started his crate training. He is up to date on his vet care, neutered, heartworm negative and is microchipped. He is on heartworm and flea/tick prevention. 
 
Please call 205-554-0011 or visit humanesocietyofwa.org to request an appointment to meet the available animals.
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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Sat, 16 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
Tuscaloosa Marks the U.S. Army’s 243rd Birthday with a Celebration http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2396-tuscaloosa-marks-the-u-s-army-s-243rd-birthday-with-a-celebration http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2396-tuscaloosa-marks-the-u-s-army-s-243rd-birthday-with-a-celebration Retired Ala National Guard Master Sergeant Ron Andress and Cadet Preston Reynolds cutting the traditional Army cake during the Army birthday last year.

On Thursday, June 14, a special celebration marking the U.S. Army’s 243rd birthday will be held. The event is free and open to the public. The event includes a special cake cutting by Korean Army Veteran Leroy McAbee, Sr.

The Association of the U.S. Army, West/Central Alabama Chapter, in partnership with the Tuscaloosa Sons of the American Revolution, is hosting the 243rd United States Army Birthday at the U.S. Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse (Room 1502, 2005 University Blvd.) beginning at 3:30 p.m.

A cake cutting ceremony, a time-honored tradition, will take place. The highest and lowest ranking members in attendance cut the cake together with an Army saber—which serves as a reminder that the Army is a band of warriors, committed to carrying the sword at every turn. 

The Army’s birthday is marked on the day that Second Continental Congress authorized the Continental Army – a force formed by approximately 22,000 militiamen who were already gathered outside of Boston. In the first official U.S. Army instance of “hurry up and wait,” the now-official Army waited three weeks to nominate General George Washington to formally take command on July 3, 1775.

Each year, as the Army celebrates another year of doing its part to protect the country, they look to the past and recognize the sacrifices of those who have come before.

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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Tue, 12 Jun 2018 16:52:25 -0500
Tuscaloosa’s Mayor Maddox Names Mobile's Randy Smith as New Fire and Rescue Chief http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2395-tuscaloosa-s-mayor-maddox-names-mobile-s-randy-smith-as-new-fire-and-rescue-chief http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2395-tuscaloosa-s-mayor-maddox-names-mobile-s-randy-smith-as-new-fire-and-rescue-chief Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox named Randy Smith chief of the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service at Fire Station Four on June 11.

City of Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox has appointed Randy Smith as chief of the Tuscaloosa Fire and Rescue Service, and he believes Smith will be a “fantastic asset” to the city of Tuscaloosa.

“Chief Smith will lead Tuscaloosa’s fire and rescue programs to new heights,” Maddox said in a statement. “With his emphasis on safety, integrity, and growth, he will be a great leader and make the welfare of our community his top priority.”

During the announcement, held at Tuscaloosa’s Fire Station Four, Maddox emphasized the importance of the position.

“When you select a fire chief, you are not only selecting a department head of the city, you are selecting someone that literally has the lives of 250 firefighters and potentially 100,000 citizens in their hands,” Maddox said.

Smith previously served as the deputy fire chief for the City of Mobile Fire-Rescue Department, where he has worked since 1987. He said he’s excited to get to work in Tuscaloosa.

“This is a great community, and this is a great department,” Smith said. “I can’t tell you how honored and humbled I am to be here working with you.”

Smith has 31 years in fire and rescue services. He has also served as the team commander for a federal disaster medical team since 2002, providing disaster response to multiple national security special events, the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center, and numerous hurricanes.

Smith holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of South Alabama and a master’s degree from Jacksonville State University in emergency management.

Smith’s predecessor, Chief Alan Martin, announced his retirement in January after serving in the position since 2002, and in the fire service for over four decades.

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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Mon, 11 Jun 2018 14:00:17 -0500
The Land of Oz: Thank You, But I Think You Forgot Something http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2392-the-land-of-oz-thank-you-but-i-think-you-forgot-something http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2392-the-land-of-oz-thank-you-but-i-think-you-forgot-something The Land of Oz: Thank You, But I Think You Forgot Something

Welcome to summer! We've skipped spring and entered directly into humidity heaven. Let the sweat commence!

I typically use this space of beautiful, contextual prose to try and enlighten lives in our community, or to make fun of myself, as a reminder that we are all humorously flawed individuals. 

But not today. Today, you get a mild rant… fueled by ongoing frustration. And I bet you can guess what it concerns before you proceed. 

A few months ago, an abundance of exquisitely shaped, ornamental orange barrels began lining the streets of the notorious Highway 69 south in preparation of expanding the old girl to six lanes. Wonderful! They even figured out how to make a two-lane bridge expand to handle three lanes of traffic by simply repainting the lines. Fantastic!

All of this, I assume, is in preparation of the much talked about 69s/Skyland overpass/flyover, which has been touted as possibly the greatest traffic reliever in the history of modern times. For movie-goers, and Outback Steakhouse lovers, and Chick-Fil-A addicts, and all residents of the 69 South area, let’s hope this is true. 

However, in the process of the six-lane expansion planning, there was apparently one glaring detail apparently omitted… turn lanes are important. 

This is not a knock on the road construction contractor. In fact, I think they did an excellent job… other than occasionally leaving those elegant orange barrels in turn lanes. 

But now, there are no turn lanes. And as stating the obvious is part of my shtick, this is problematic. Now, instead of utilizing the preexisting turn lanes to access roads, I’m sitting in traffic behind people in the right lane who are not turning, which is… wait for it… creating more traffic. 

To make matters worse, it is assumed that part of the reason for the expansion was to give the flyover crews new lanes to close during construction. Without turn lanes, we’ve got issues. Add in that drivers are now forced to slow down to a stop in order to turn among vehicles traveling 50 mph, and you better make sure your vehicle insurance is up to date. 

This reality check is not conceived to lay blame. If anything, it’s to raise awareness of an issue, so hopefully, someone who has more pull than I do reads this. The traffic issues in that area, and others around town, can be incredibly difficult to resolve. But in this case, turn lanes are not a minor oversight, especially when you are dealing with humorously flawed driving individuals… like me.  

I tweet insignificant things @ozborn34.           

Derek Osborn is the Executive Director of PRIDE of Tuscaloosa by trade and a writer by hobby. He lives in Tuscaloosa with his wife, Lynn, and their daughters, Savannah and Anica.   

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Community Wed, 13 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
Tales of Tuscaloosa: “Cooties The Cause Of A Killing…” (June 12, 1919) http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2390-tales-of-tuscaloosa-cooties-the-cause-of-a-killing-june-12-1919 http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2390-tales-of-tuscaloosa-cooties-the-cause-of-a-killing-june-12-1919 Woods Hall, shown in about 1905, was the scene of a gunfight in 1883.

A sharp succession of shots rang out, and a gray clad figure fell. It was February of 1883, and two cadets were fighting a pistol duel on the porch of Woods Hall on the University of Alabama campus. The integrity of a young woman had been questioned, and a challenge was issued in defense of her honor. Cadet William Alston of Selma succumbed to wounds inflicted by Cadet H. K. Harrison. Over a year later, Harrison was found not guilty of murder.

Throughout much of Tuscaloosa’s history, violence was a common occurrence permeating all classes and races. At farms, mines, lumber camps, saloons, and even on the University campus, disagreements, even those of the most trivial nature, could suddenly escalate to mayhem. 

In 1891, Editor John Lawrence of the West Alabama Breeze noted that: “One or two little difficulties occurred during the Holidays which served to break the monotony and also the heads of the belligerents. Black eyes are now fashionable.”

In Stars Fell On Alabama in 1934, Carl Carmer noted that in Tuscaloosa: “No one knows what storms are brewing in the soul of his jovial golf partner, his sedate colleague on the university faculty, the lanky sallow-faced farmer at the street market, the black cook singing at her work in the kitchen. Tomorrow any one of them may have committed a ‘crime passionnel.’”

Differences in Reconstruction politics led to perhaps the best-known local “rencontre,” or hostile meeting. In 1870, Ryland Randolph, Editor of the Independent Monitor and Ku Klux Klan leader, was confronted on a downtown sidewalk by University Cadet Smith. According to reports of the time, Cadet Smith had conspired with Radical Republican Professor Vernon H. Vaughn to bait Randolph into a fatal confrontation. In the resultant gunfight Randolph was wounded, and William Byrd, an elderly bystander, was killed. Randolph’s leg was amputated while Smith and Vaughn fled the state. Soon afterwards, President Ulysses S. Grant appointed Vaughn Territorial Governor of Utah. Randolph continued his newspaper career and later moved to Birmingham.

Illustration from the 1854 novel Ten Nights in a Bar-room. Image courtesy of Wikipedia Commons.

In 1892, Professor W. H. Verner, a renowned local educator, and H. M. Somerville, a circuit judge, engaged in a “personal difficulty” at the Tuskaloosa Gazette office. The feud continued for over a year with Professor Verner being arrested and tried for assault.

In 1897, Alvin Stoneking and Gus Lallande were drinking at the White Elephant Saloon near the present-day Bama Theater. Between rounds, they alternated purchasing cigars. An argument over a perceived difference in the quality of the stogies escalated into a gunfight. Lallande fell mortally wounded in the middle of Greensboro Avenue. Stoneking was convicted of murder and sentenced to 10 years in prison but was freed after a later retrial.

On June 12, 1919, the West Alabama Breeze related a story titled, “Cooties The Cause Of A Killing Late Wednesday At Buhl. Wash Brown accused Virgil Brown of having the “pestiferous little animals crawling over his body.” Virgil Brown was fatally stabbed through the heart in the ensuing fight. Wash Brown claimed self-defense and displayed a large knot on his head that he claimed was caused by a blow from a fence board.

Whether it was differences in politics, perceived insults, cheap cigars, or body lice, excuses never seemed to be lacking for disagreements that often ended in bodily harm or death. Or perhaps, as Carl Carmer noted of Tuscaloosa, “a malevolent landscape—lush and foreboding—broods over it bending its people to strange purposes. 

Suggested additional reading: 

Stars Fell on Alabama, by Carl Carmer 

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Community Tue, 12 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
A Friendly Reminder: Stay Safe on Lake Tuscaloosa This Summer http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2389-a-friendly-reminder-stay-safe-on-lake-tuscaloosa-this-summer http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2389-a-friendly-reminder-stay-safe-on-lake-tuscaloosa-this-summer Always use caution when swimming around boat docks. Annual inspections of docks with electricity are required.

It is full season on Lake Tuscaloosa for making memories with family and friends on the water. 

The city is also in full force to see that your experience is a good one. 

Homeowners with docks on Lake Tuscaloosa recently received notice that all docks should comply with specific electrical requirements by May 31. 

There are approved certified electricians who can be used, and according to one of them at the time I’m writing this, only 68 percent of the docks had been approved. He told me he had a backlog of over 100 to inspect. Of the ones he had already viewed, only two were in compliance – and they are owned by electricians. 

Water and electricity, as we know, is a dangerous mix. Our lake has experienced only a few electrocutions, but one is too many. These can be avoided with proper installation. Special wiring, a minimum height of 35 inches off the ground, and a kill switch are the recommended requirements. 

There are ways you can tell if you might have a problem, according to Lee Hannah of Smith's Marina. He says if you see lots of fish gathering under your dock, they may be drawn to a slight electrical current. Also, the presence of barnacles on your boat is a sign of a potential issue.  

Homeowners around the lake are now experiencing costs of between $200 and $9,000 to comply with these codes – but for families, and their safety, it’s worth it.

If you are hopping out of the boat to get wet, unless you see a tag saying it was approved, don't swim near a random pier. 

Be safe on the water. Be sure you have life jackets in the boat. Remember to be wary of strangers' docks. Respect other boaters, and have an amazing summer 2018. 

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Community Tue, 12 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500
DCL Weekly: Community Calendar of Events http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2388-dcl-weekly-community-calendar-of-events http://druidcityliving.com/index.php/community/item/2388-dcl-weekly-community-calendar-of-events DCL Weekly: Community Calendar of Events

Here’s wishing all our Druid City Living readers a great week, filled with all kinds of outstanding local events. Get out, get involved, and above all else: Have fun. And remember: If you’d like to have your event added to our online weekly calendar, just email us at editor@druidcitymedia.com. We’re happy to add anything you’d like to announce.

Enjoy your week, T-Town!

Chamber Business After Hours: June 12, 5-7 p.m. Hotel Indigo, Tuscaloosa. For more information, visit tuscaloosachamber.com. 

Let’s Make a Deal (Focus on Senior Citizens Event): June 12, 1 p.m. McAbee Center, Tuscaloosa. Come in costume (just like the TV show!) and receive an additional free chance to win. Names will be drawn at random. For more information, contact FOCUS on Senior Citizens at 205-553-3133.

Bama Art House Films Summer Series: Tuesdays June 12 through July 17 (No screening on July 3), 7:30 p.m. Box office opens at 6:30 p.m. For more information, call (205) 758-5195 or visit bamatheatre.org/bamaarthouse. 

Elder Abuse Free Seminar: June 13, 10 a.m. to Noon, McDonald Hughes Community Center. This seminar is presented by the West Alabama Area Agency on Aging. Free CEU’s will be provided to social workers. For more information, and to register, visit westalabamaaging.org/elderabuseawareregistration.

Henry Gets Moving at CHOM: June 13, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. and 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Henry Gets Moving author Dr. Pierre Rouzier is stopping at CHOM on his 2000+ mile bike ride to Canada. Enjoy book readings, a Q&A with Rouzier, and more. For more information, visit chomonline.org. 

United Way of West Alabama Day of Action: June 15. Volunteers are needed for a community-wide day of service. Shifts are available. Projects include yard work, food service, school clean-up and more. UWWA is looking for individuals, families, and corporate groups to participate. For more information, visit uwwa.org. 

Live at the Plaza: June 15, 6 to 9 p.m. Government Plaza, downtown Tuscaloosa. This week’s musical act is Jake Austell (of the J’s) Trio and then 4G. This event is free.

Grossology at CHOM: June 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Hands-On Museum, downtown Tuscaloosa. So gross, so fun. Bubbles…Oobleck. Don’t you love the gross? All activities are included in admission. For more information, visit chomonline.org. 

Crimson Village Car Show: June 16, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Crimson Village, Tuscaloosa (1410 18th Avenue East). Switch gears this Father’s Day, and enjoy Crimson Village’s Second Annual Antique Car Show. Admission is free, and cool treats will be available for purchase. To enter your car, call (205) 650-2906.

Equality on the River @ Another Broken Egg: June 16, 6 to 9 p.m. This event, hosted by Druid City Pride, celebrates equality in West Alabama. Admission is free, but tickets are available to win prizes. For more information, visit druidcitypride.org/events.

Upcoming:

Theatre Tuscaloosa’s Summer Theatre Camp: June 18-29, Sandra Hall Ray Fine Arts Center, Shelton State’s Martin Campus, Tuscaloosa. To register, or for more information, visit theatretusc.com. 

Alabama Museum of Natural History Expedition: June 18-23. Participants will have the unique opportunity to work with scientists in the field of archaeology as part of an actual scientific research project to explore the history of Alabama. Students, teachers, and adults will spend a week at the Expedition field camp working with scientists to learn excavation techniques, laboratory procedures, and artifact identification. For more information, visit museums.ua.edu.

Kids Clay Camps at Kentuck: Beginning June 19, The Clay Place, Kentuck’s Courtyard of Wonders. Red Dog Potter Shirley Hayes Dobbins instructs children on hand-building with clay, glazing, and self-expression. For more information, including age groups, pricing, and registration, call (205) 758-1257 or visit kentuck.org. 

Morning Pointe Rock-A-Thon: June 21, 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. Morning Pointe Tuscaloosa (1801 Rice Mine Road North). Meet on the porch, grab a rocking chair, enjoy live music, and help raise money for Alzheimer’s research. For more information, call 205-345-1112.

Black Warrior Riverkeeper and Hurricane Creekkeeper River Cruise: June 21, 6-9 p.m. Bama Belle Riverboat, Tuscaloosa. This sunset cruise features live music, dinner, and local beer celebrates the 15th anniversary of Hurricane Creekkeeper. Proceeds support the Riverkeeper’s efforts to protect the Black Warrior River watershed. Ages 21 and up. Tickets: $40. To purchase, visit bamabelle2018.eventbrite.com.  

3rd Annual Dirt, Sweat & Gears Trail Duathlon: June 23, 7:30 a.m. Lake Lurleen State Park. This DCH Foundation and DCH Sports Medicine’s event features a 10-mile trail bike ride followed by a 5K run. This duathlon also allows team competition. Tickets: $45 individual/$80 team. For more information, call (205) 759-7349. 

National Rat Catcher’s Day at CHOM: June 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Children’s Hands-On Museum, downtown Tuscaloosa. Catch the rats in CHOM for a special prize. All activities are included in admission. For more information, visit chomonline.org.

T-Town BBQ Cook Off and Fun Day: June 23, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benjamin Barnes YMCA, Tuscaloosa. Face-painting, bouncy houses, games & other children's activities; vendors, Greek paraphernalia, information booths, freebies, health fair, and chances to win prizes. Raffle tickets $5.00; you do not have to be present to win. Proceeds to provide scholarship money for deserving West AL students.

Ongoing:

Month of June

Summer Camps 2018 at CHOM: STEM Fun plus CHOM Play. “ZOOM!” June 11 - 15 • 9:30am - 12:30pm • $175 Explore Chemistry, Engineering, Circuitry, Robotics! Campers will Mix it! Design it! Build it! and Move it! Campers end the week with a Survival Raft competition. “C.S.I. CHOM” June 18 – 22 • 9:30am - 12:30pm • $175 It’s Child Science Investigator week! Crime soars in the summer heat. Campers solve CHOM’s Crime of the Summer as they Dust it! Bag it! Detect it! and Prove it! On Friday they’ll Solve it! For more information, visit chomonline.org. 

Tuscaloosa Career and Technology Academy Summer Camps: TCTA is offering free, four-day camps June 11-28, for students in grades 6 through 8. Camp topics include Engineering, Culinary Arts, Animation, Fire College, Police Academy, Cosmetology, Military/JROTC, TV Production, Drones, and Mercedes-Benz. Visit www.tuscaloosacityschools.com/Page/1947 for more information and to sign up.

Tuscaloosa Farmer’s Market: Saturdays, 7 a.m.-noon.; Tuesdays 3-6 p.m. Tuscaloosa River Market, 1900 Jack Warner Blvd, Tuscaloosa. Shop for fresh produce, grass fed beef, baked goods, cheeses and more. Buy fresh, buy local. For more information, visit tuscaloosarivermarket.com or call (205) 248-5295. 

 

 

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contact@druidcitymedia.com (Super User) Community Mon, 11 Jun 2018 00:00:00 -0500