Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force Brings Winter Institute Reconciliation Workshops to Tuscaloosa

05 Oct 2017

The Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force and the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation will bring to Tuscaloosa a three-day “Welcome Table” workshop to encourage engaged citizens by sharing and addressing our common history. The program, supported by Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox, will be held at the First United Methodist Church, 800 Greensboro Avenue on Oct. 6-8.

The Welcome Table equips diverse community stakeholders with the tools necessary to work together and overcome local issues, both economic and social that are caused by race. Community leaders from Tuscaloosa have been invited to participate in the three-day workshop to learn more about conducting a series of future events to be held in Tuscaloosa.

“Each participant will lean how to facilitate Welcome Table discussions,” states Dr. Scott Bridges, co-founder of the Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force, “where participants from all races and realms of life will honestly share their life experiences. It is a common understanding that many of the prejudices of today come from cruelties and mistakes of the past. Previous Welcome Table programs have resulted in community members forming bonds, creating friendships, and discovering commonalities in order to talk about ways of working toward racial reconciliation both personally and within the Tuscaloosa community.”

After this October workshop, the Task Force will begin to sponsor regular Welcome Table discussions for the next year, all held at First United Methodist in downtown Tuscaloosa. Each group will have the freedom to talk, share, reveal, and heal in a milieu conducive to the intimacy necessary for such an undertaking.

The Tuscaloosa Civil Rights History Task Force will be celebrating its first anniversary of receiving its Proclamation by Tuscaloosa Mayor Walt Maddox and the City Council in October 2017. The Task Force is a diverse group of committed and focused individuals who believe the path to the future is through honesty with our past. By documenting the events of our past, we can move toward reconciliation and healing. A Civil Rights Trail is under development by the Task Force and will benefit the Tuscaloosa community economically by drawing visitors who come seeking to learn and know more about our city’s history as Alabama is now recognized as the place where much of America’s Civil Rights history occurred.

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