POW/MIA Chair of Honor Dedicated at Tuscaloosa Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse

Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Command Sergeant Major Bennie G. Adkins (Vietnam) and General Charles C. Krulak, 31st Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps will help to unveil and dedicate the POW/MIA Chair of Honor on Apr. 28. Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Command Sergeant Major Bennie G. Adkins (Vietnam) and General Charles C. Krulak, 31st Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps will help to unveil and dedicate the POW/MIA Chair of Honor on Apr. 28. Nicolas Britto

Since World War II began, more than 83,000 Americans remain missing. On Friday, a special dedication was held to honor the POW/MIAs: a special Chair of Honor, located on the second floor of the U.S. Courthouse and Federal Building in downtown Tuscaloosa. The chair will remain perpetually empty, in memory of all Americans who have gone missing or became prisoners of war while serving their country.

The Association of the United States Army, (AUSA) Tuscaloosa Chapter, in association with the United States District and Bankruptcy Courts for the Northern District of Alabama, dedicated the Prisoner of War/Missing in Action Chair of Honor on Friday, April 28, at 4 p.m.

The POW/MIA Chair of Honor Program’s main function is to spread awareness for POW/MIA service members who remain unaccounted for, and to let their families know they have not been forgotten.

“The Tuscaloosa Chapter of the AUSA is committed to educating future generations on the sacrifices our servicemen have made to protect our country,” said Nicolas Britto, the organization’s president. “There is no better place in this city than this courthouse to display this memorial honoring our POW/MIAs.”

Congressional Medal of Honor recipient Command Sergeant Major Bennie G. Adkins (Vietnam), General Charles C. Krulak, 31st Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, and Helen Lemonis, daughter of former WWII POW Pete Lemonis unveiled and dedicated the POW-MIA Chair of Honor during the ceremony. Music was be provided by the 313th U.S. Army Band, Dr. Luvada Harrison will sing the National Anthem, and “Taps” will be performed by Elijah Pugh and David Myers.

3-year-old Rhodes T. Norton was visiting the U.S. Courthouse and Federal Building in Tuscaloosa recently when he broke away from his mom, taking his stuffed University of Alabama elephant with him. Rhodes put the stuffed elephant on the floor across from the POW-MIA Memorial and sat on it with his eyes looking directly at the picture of former WWII POW Pete Lemonis and his family. Rhodes is the son of Stuart and Anna Belle Norton.

 

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Druid City Living (DCL) is Tuscaloosa, Alabama's premier community newspaper, covering the great people, places and activities of the area.

 

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